the Quillink annotated

Morrick's modern commonplace book.
Quick notes, interesting bits, annotated leaves, sundry things found and picked up. – by Riccardo Mori

When technology companies look at goods that are built from the outside in, they generally see irrationality and inefficiency, a broken market just waiting to be corrected and “disrupted.” They believe that they can engineer so much value into these items that people will be swayed to buy goods built from the inside out, that the promise that drives hardware and software—“adopt this and benefit from its utility”—will convince people to upend their sartorial habits. This is how you get products like Google Glass, which assumes that consumers prize utility so much that they’re willing to look like they have no interest whatsoever in having intimate relations with another human being.

Khoi Vinh, Wearables, Fashion and iWatch

From: Monogram Logo book — designed by Leterme Dowling

(via typetoken®)

Writers No One Reads:

Some quotes from The Guardian’s obituary for Rosemary Tonks (1928 – 2014) via ayjay.tumblr.com. 

The poet Rosemary Tonks, who has died aged 85, famously “disappeared” in the 1970s. The author of two poetry collections and six published novels, she turned her back on the literary world after a series of personal tragedies and medical crises which made her question the value of literature and embark on a restless, self-torturing spiritual quest.
[…]
Living for the next four decades as the reclusive Mrs Lightband in an anonymous-looking old house tucked away behind Bournemouth seafront, she cut herself off from her former life, refusing to see relatives, old friends, or publishers like me who hoped she might change her mind and allow her poetry to be reissued. As far as the literary world was concerned, she “evaporated into air like the Cheshire cat”, as Brian Patten put it in a BBC Lost Voices half-hour feature, The Poet Who Vanished, broadcast on Radio 4 in 2009.

[…]
Moving into the Bournemouth house in 1980, she completed the obliteration of the person she had been, consigning an unpublished novel to the garden incinerator…


From The Sofas, Fogs and Cinemas via:
On my bad days (and I’m being brokenAt this very moment) I speak of my ambitions…and heBecomes intensely gloomy, with the look of something jugged,Morose, sour, mouldering away, with lockjaw….
I grow coarser: and more modern (I, who am driven madBy my ideas; who go nowhere;Who dare not leave my front door, lest an idea…)All right. I admit everything, everything!
Oh yes, the opera (Ah, but the cinema)He particularly enjoys it, enjoys it horribly, when someone’s illAt the last minute; and they specially fly inA new, gigantic, Dutch soprano. He wants to help herWith her arias. Old goat! Blasphemer!He wants to help her with her arias!
No, I… go to the cinema,I particularly like it when the fog is thick, the streetIs like a hole in an old coat, and the light is brown as laudanum…
***
Some links: one, two, three, four.
Photo: “Rosemary Tonks in the 1960s…Photograph: Jane Bown”

Writers No One Reads:

Some quotes from The Guardian’s obituary for Rosemary Tonks (1928 – 2014) via ayjay.tumblr.com

The poet Rosemary Tonks, who has died aged 85, famously “disappeared” in the 1970s. The author of two poetry collections and six published novels, she turned her back on the literary world after a series of personal tragedies and medical crises which made her question the value of literature and embark on a restless, self-torturing spiritual quest.

[…]

Living for the next four decades as the reclusive Mrs Lightband in an anonymous-looking old house tucked away behind Bournemouth seafront, she cut herself off from her former life, refusing to see relatives, old friends, or publishers like me who hoped she might change her mind and allow her poetry to be reissued. As far as the literary world was concerned, she “evaporated into air like the Cheshire cat”, as Brian Patten put it in a BBC Lost Voices half-hour feature, The Poet Who Vanished, broadcast on Radio 4 in 2009.

[…]

Moving into the Bournemouth house in 1980, she completed the obliteration of the person she had been, consigning an unpublished novel to the garden incinerator…

From The Sofas, Fogs and Cinemas via:

On my bad days (and I’m being broken
At this very moment) I speak of my ambitions…and he
Becomes intensely gloomy, with the look of something jugged,
Morose, sour, mouldering away, with lockjaw….

I grow coarser: and more modern (I, who am driven mad
By my ideas; who go nowhere;
Who dare not leave my front door, lest an idea…)
All right. I admit everything, everything!

Oh yes, the opera (Ah, but the cinema)
He particularly enjoys it, enjoys it horribly, when someone’s ill
At the last minute; and they specially fly in
A new, gigantic, Dutch soprano. He wants to help her
With her arias. Old goat! Blasphemer!
He wants to help her with her arias!

No, I… go to the cinema,
I particularly like it when the fog is thick, the street
Is like a hole in an old coat, and the light is brown as laudanum…

***

Some links: one, two, three, four.

Photo: “Rosemary Tonks in the 1960s…Photograph: Jane Bown”

Map of the Italian Colonies
I love old maps. I found this while going through the vast amount of materials I inherited from my late grandfather. The map has no evident print date, but it should be from the mid-1930s. It was in a bad state, mostly ripped across the folds, and I’ve restored it the best I could with the help of my wife. 
The photo isn’t great, and a scan would have been a better option, but not viable since the map measures 100×75 centimetres. So I resorted to taking a snap with my iPad hovering over the table. In the future I may post scans of some parts of it, because the typeface design is really beautiful. 

Map of the Italian Colonies

I love old maps. I found this while going through the vast amount of materials I inherited from my late grandfather. The map has no evident print date, but it should be from the mid-1930s. It was in a bad state, mostly ripped across the folds, and I’ve restored it the best I could with the help of my wife. 

The photo isn’t great, and a scan would have been a better option, but not viable since the map measures 100×75 centimetres. So I resorted to taking a snap with my iPad hovering over the table. In the future I may post scans of some parts of it, because the typeface design is really beautiful. 

Sidetrack — by Marcin Wolski
Earlier today I discovered by chance the portfolio of Marcin Wolski, a graphic designer and illustrator from Poland. I really like his work, especially the paintings and watercolours. Check it out!  

Sidetrack — by Marcin Wolski

Earlier today I discovered by chance the portfolio of Marcin Wolski, a graphic designer and illustrator from Poland. I really like his work, especially the paintings and watercolours. Check it out!  

Macintosh Duo system in “Seinfeld”

image

 

I don’t know from which episode of Seinfeld this still is taken — I’ve noticed it while watching the fascinatingly weird Nothing montage by LJ Frezza. So great to see that particular Apple hardware featured in a TV series.

iPhone 4 and live filters
The camera feature in Flickr’s iPhone app has live filters and it’s super responsive on my iPhone 4. Yet, iOS 7’s built-in Camera app doesn’t have live filters on the iPhone 4. One would believe that such omission on Apple’s part has something to do with the hardware limitations of this device, but after taking a few shots with Flickr’s app it’s clear that it’s not the case.

iPhone 4 and live filters

The camera feature in Flickr’s iPhone app has live filters and it’s super responsive on my iPhone 4. Yet, iOS 7’s built-in Camera app doesn’t have live filters on the iPhone 4. One would believe that such omission on Apple’s part has something to do with the hardware limitations of this device, but after taking a few shots with Flickr’s app it’s clear that it’s not the case.

Reblogged from nevver:

Progress

Reblogged from nevver:

Progress